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The Life and Times of Airline Travel in Canada

Tuesday, October 16th, 2001
PIAC report: High Hopes and Low Standards! – The Life and Times of Airline Travel in Canada

Airline at the Trough

Thursday, October 4th, 2001
The Sept. 11 slump is only one of Air Canada's burdens. Worse is a corporate culture that takes customers for granted, says consumer advocate Michael Janigan

Air Canada treats passengers shabbily, letter to Minister Collenette, 2001

Thursday, September 20th, 2001
The Public Interest Advocacy Centre is a founding member of the Canadian Association of Air Passengers (CAAP). PIAC has been involved in the policy discussions that have taken place since the onset of the restructured Canadian airline industry in 1999.

Turbulence ahead for Canadian air travel

Monday, February 19th, 2001
In Canada, the barometer for how a competitive market should work is almost always the United States. When Canadian industries are forced to cut jobs, raise prices, or behave in a consumer-unfriendly manner, the usual rejoinder to public criticism is that the same thing is happening south of the border. The standard Canadian assumption is that the free market cauldron of the United States winnows out inefficiency, high prices, and poor customer service. Canadian utilities who have dined on this questionable folk wisdom for years have now been joined at the table by Air Canada, whose CEO has discovered the escape valve of selectively citing U.S. airline pricing statistics as proof positive of the controlling hand of the market rather than his own airline's financial dictates.

The airline ticket pricing game

Monday, February 12th, 2001
Perhaps no other aspect of air travel is so filled with inaccurate and misleading information as the market place for best prices for airline tickets. It is a problem that extends beyond national borders. Consumers Union, publisher of Consumers Reports said in a September 2000 media release that “when consumers are quoted prices for tickets, they often presume that these fares represent the best prices among all of the available flights. But that's not always the case. Sometimes the seller may omit certain fares or certain carriers. When a consumer can't find the cheapest prices the market has to offer, it raises disturbing questions about the sellers' motives and biases.”

Permanent holding pattern for Canadian air travellers

Tuesday, January 30th, 2001
Most air travelers have a collection of airline horror stories which are recounted with a “can you top this” flair to fellow passengers whenever contretemps occur en route. There can be little doubt that the shock value and volume of these stories were vastly enriched by the performance of Air Canada in 2000.

Speaking Notes before the Commitee

Wednesday, May 3rd, 2000
We would first like to extend our thanks to the Committee for allowing us to present the views of the Canadian Association of Airline Passengers (CAAP) concerning the future of the Canadian airline industry and the proposed amendments to the Canada Transportation Act. The Canadian Association of Airline Passengers is an ad hoc coalition of public interest and consumer groups and organizations who are concerned with the delivery of this important public transportation service in a manner in keeping with the interests of the ordinary Canadian consumer. The coalition was formed during the summer of 1999, when the various proposals for merger of Canada's two principal airlines were being floated, and it appeared that the normal process for review of any merger by the Competition Bureau would be circumvented. The names of the coalition members are appended to this document.

The Restructured Airline Market in Canada

Sunday, March 12th, 2000
Nine measures to help establish a more level playing field between passengers and airlines in Canada.

Letter to the Minister of Transport

Wednesday, January 19th, 2000
As a follow-up to our meeting with you in November 1999, we are writing on behalf on the Canadian Association of Airline Passengers (CAAP) to set out some principal concerns associated with the upcoming introduction of legislative amendments to the Canada Transportation Act. We hope that these comments may be of assistance to you and your officials in preparing such amendments.

Speaking Notes Before the Committee November 22, 1999

Monday, November 22nd, 1999
We would first like to extend our thanks to the Committee for allowing us to present the views of the Canadian association of Airline Passengers (CAAP) concerning the future of the Canadian Airline Industry. The Canadian Association of Airline Passengers is a ad hoc coalition of public interest and consumer groups and organizations who are concerned with the delivery of this important public transportation service in a manner in keeping with the interests of the ordinary Canadian consumer. The coalition was formed during the summer of 1999, when the various proposals for merger of Canada's two principal airlines were being floated and it appeared that the normal process for review of any merger by the Competition Bureau would be circumvented.
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